Occupy Wall Street and Creating a New Perception of Work

There's no denying that something fascinating is happening around the country -- and the world -- as the "Occupy Wall Street" movement has captured the attention of people everywhere.

Time will tell what will become of this burgeoning movement as individuals bring differing solutions to what they see as the problem. For the purposes of this post, we will define the primary challenge of "Occupy" as this: Our current financial, business, and government systems are unjustly stacked in the direction of the already-wealthy. This sentiment is found in most of the writings of "The 99%" and across the board in the complaints of protesters, where typical issues range from healthcare to home stability to jobs to education.

Recognizing this complexity brings us an important insight: What we have before us is not a one-dimensional problem, and it will not have a one-dimensional solution.

That said, the challenges mentioned do have a common thread: WORK.

No matter the issue, it can somehow be connected back to the world of business. From unemployment to medical costs to being able to make our mortgage payment, none of these issues exist -- or will be solved -- apart from us changing some things about the way we work.

And this is where entrepreneurs can, and will, help.

A startup can move incredibly nimbly and quickly, adapting to the marketplace in fresh and human ways.

New companies can be more experimental with new, untested ideas than an established organization could.

Perhaps most importantly, entrepreneurs are in a unique position to be able to think differently about business systems and methods.

A wise guy once said something about not being able to solve future problems without new kinds of thinking. This idea has never been more poignant. The only way out of the current mess we’re in is to create new things -- and this is an entrepreneur’s specialty.

We cannot create a better future by maintaining the status quo.

We will never move forward by trying to preserve yesterday.

Fortunately, the best entrepreneurs are always looking ahead to the tomorrow that will be better for us all.

About Josh Allan Dykstra

Josh Allan Dykstra is a recognized thought leader on the future of work and company culture design. He is a co-founder of Strengths Doctors, a consulting firm that helps leaders and entrepreneurs design energizing places to work, and a co-founder of The Work Revolution, a movement + campaign that advocates for life-giving work environments. Connect with him online at joshallan.com.

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